Monthly Archives: June 2014

Staying Busy in Costa Rica – Coffee Coasters

There’s alot of time on your hands when you retire, so finding a hobby or an activity that not only fills up the time but can actually feel like time doesn’t exist when you are doing it is imperative. I create coffee coasters.

Finished coasters

Finished coasters

A couple of people have asked how to make them, so today I’m sharing a step by step tutorial.

Supplies: poster board, paints, brushes, straight edge, ruler and lotsa patience

I use both tempera and acrylic paints

I use both tempera and acrylic paints

You will need a straight edge, ruler, a sized template for final product

You will need a straight edge, ruler, a sized template for final product

To get started, you need to paint the poster board, deciding whether you want a plain background or a colorful one. I do a colorful one, allowing the paint to thoroughly dry between each layer. I also use sponge brushes for this initial process, doing up to six layers of different colors.

In progress, this medium sized poster board has 4 layers of colors, but more to come.

In progress, this medium sized poster board has 4 layers of colors, but more to come.

Once the paint gets to where you want the background to be and it is totally dry, you’ll cut the poster board into strips, and then into individual coasters.

Here I'm showing you how a finished coaster is used to line up the ruler to cut a strip of painted poster board. Since these are handmade there are going to be some differences in final sizes.

Here I’m showing you how a finished coaster is used to line up the ruler to cut a strip of painted poster board. Since these are handmade there are going to be some differences in final sizes.

Use your primary template to line up your ruler, then very intentionally and with great concentration use the straight edge to cut a strip of poster board from the main painted piece. You then cut each individual coaster from that strip.

Use your primary template to line up your ruler, then very intentionally and with great concentration use the straight edge to cut a strip of poster board from the main painted piece. You then cut each individual coaster from that strip.

Determine now if you are ready to waterproof each coaster, or go onto the next step, which is drawing/tracing images onto each one.

Trace the outline of your image onto the backside of a cold cereal box and then cut it out and use a permanent marker around the edges.

Trace the outline of your image onto the backside of a cold cereal box and then cut it out and use a permanent marker around the edges on the coaster.

Use carbon paper to trace the images onto your coaster if your background is light enough or just one color.

Or use carbon paper to trace the images onto your coaster if your background is light enough or just one color.

Use your cardboard cutout and a permanent marker to outline the image.

Use your cardboard cutout and a permanent marker to outline the image.

This is your traced butterfly ready for decorating.

This is your traced butterfly ready for decorating.

Decorating the traced object is fun for me – and just like decorating Christmas Cookies, there are never two that turn out the same.

To finish the coasters I use the sponge brush again to paint around the coaster to give the illusion of a frame. Then I use a large brush to cover one side and then the other with polyurethane to waterproof them. Be sure and let them really, really dry at this point. You’re done! Be sure and look for my coasters in the Tico Pod Art Store when you’re next in Jaco!

Advertisements

A River Home in Costa Rica

Looking upriver from the vantage point immediately below my house.

Looking upriver from the vantage point immediately below my house.

Living in Costa Rica is a marvelous experience for many reasons, but for me the primary one is living with nature. I began by living on a farm on a mountain above a small town… pretty close to  my son and his family. That I had family here was a bonus for me and allowed my introduction to the Tico culture and the neighborhood/barrio I was living in a  smoother transition than for those who move here without a connection. Reputation, especially family reputation, has huge importance in this culture. Aunts, uncles, cousins, everyone is interconnected here, so just mentioning a name of someone leads to understanding which family you are from and, thus, who you are. It’s a valuable commodity. I bring up this type of connection because when those moving to this country don’t have family here, the creation of a network within the Tico community has to be dealt with consciously to ensure a comfortable living – and eventually a comfortable place to live. Getting close to the land within a Tico community is difficult without a viable network working on your behalf.

So, here is where I’m living after 2 years on the farm:

View of the front of my house from the river.

View of the front of my house from the river.

When I first moved to Costa Rica, I was lucky enough to find a place on craigslist.org and it worked out as I became acquainted with this new retirement lifestyle. I’d never envisioned living within another neighborhood where English was the primary language; the difference in cultures was alot of what drew me here (not to mention the inability to live on social security in the US or the fact that my son and his family lived here). What endears me to Costa Rica are 1) the people and 2) their connection to the Earth. There’s a respect here that is new to me between those that live with the land instead of on it.

It’s now the rainy season, and by that I mean monsooning every afternoon, so the river is roaring, swollen and loud…

This after days of monsoons... usually the water doesn't reach half the width seen here.

This after days of monsoons… usually the water doesn’t reach half the width seen here.

 

But one of the delights of living above or close to a river is the sound. It’s not white noise. Rivers have their own language, too. Their wildness and unrestrained movements are fascinating to sit and watch. And the birds! So many different types around a river. One day as I was having my morning coffee a young deer wandered into the property. A little later a hawk came charging right at my head through the trees with a baby bird in it’s claws, screeching at the mother bird hazing it from behind. And there are mot mot’s living just a bit of a drop from where I sit with my coffee, so I get to watch their blue and green feathers flitting through the forest most of the day. This is a very special place, and I wouldn’t be living here if it weren’t for the 2 years spent establishing myself in this community. I feel those 2 years were kind of like an initiation, a time during which I was observed and accepted.

View of the living room end of my house. Notice the windows... incredible, like living outside.

View of the living room end of my house. Notice the windows… incredible, like living outside.

So, I feel that I’ve earned this place. I feel that I’m living among the trees and birds and the river life. Living in a house close to the water like this is not all roses, though. Everything, even my clothes, are damp. I have to sweep and mop the floors every day because of the wind and walking in all kinds of detrius from the trees and grounds. It’s a bit moldy and there are bugs galore all day and especially at night around the lights even in the house because the house is old and not as plumb around the windows and doors as I’ve been used to… and there is wildlife that lives and then dies all around me. Squirrels who use an adjacent limb as a diving board to land on my tin roof, possums climbing over the roof at night moving from one set of trees to another, ants that are simply incessantly into everything. And then this:

Don't know if it's dead or resting and haven't had the guts to go back and see if it's still there or has slithered to parts unknown, hopefully not my yard..... the door is closed just in case!

Don’t know if it’s dead or resting and haven’t had the guts to go back and see if it’s still there or has slithered to parts unknown, hopefully not my yard….. the door is closed just in case!

It did turn out to be actually dead, so soon the vultures will gather and we’ll have a hellovatime keeping the dogs away from the carcass as well. But it’s all about the nature, the life of which includes so many wonderful surprises and mysteries and glowing fairy lights at night.